Weight Loss Surgery – Do you Qualify ?

When approaching a new weight loss routine, it can be difficult to get started. Some of us are more blessed than others are when it comes to easily shedding pounds. It may be a case of having tried and tried again, only to find that you are getting nowhere, leading to understandable discouragement.

Consequently,this has led you to ask the question whether you would be a good candidate for Weight Loss Surgery which is commonly refered to as BARIATRIC SURGERY as explained below:

​[ Baros means “weight” in Greek; so, for example, a barometer is an instrument that measures air pressure or weight. Bariatric describes the medical treatment of serious overweight—that is, obesity. Bariatric surgery is only employed when other methods of weight loss have been tried and failed.

Though stapling the stomach may seem extreme, we now know that obesity greatly increases the risk of heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and stroke, so stomach surgery doesn’t just help people look and feel better—it’s a potential lifesaver. ]

The principal causes of obesity are (1) Too many calories ie an imbalance exists between calorie intake and utilization and (2) Insufficient or no physical exercise.

Bariatric Surgery is a surgical option (or you could say surgical opportunity) for obese individuals to lose weight when their excessive weight is such that it presents a serious obstacle to their good health or,at worst, is life-threatening. The procedure involves the surgical removal of a part of the stomach so as to reduce its capacity or to restrict the absorption of digested food from the small intestine.

Therefore,weight loss surgery achieves 2 conditions paramount to significantly reducing the excess weight carried by obese subjects, namely:

  • promotes early satiety ie the sensation of felling ‘full-up’ by reducing the capacity of the stomach as regards its contents at any given time.
  • fewer calories are released into the body  since the amount of digested food absorbed has been reduced.

With all this clearly understood, let’s look at the different types of weight loss surgery available to the obese sufferer. Refer to the illustrative image* below: ​​​ 

​​​[ click on the image* to view in another window & then zoom + according to your preference ]

It should be stressed that irrespective of the type of surgery undergone by the obese patient, the only way for it to be true success is by eating a healthy and balanced diet before and after the intervention.

Benefits

Generally, weight loss occurs for up to 24 months after weight loss surgery. At that point, there are people that will regain some weight, but that will certainly not be the case for all. Medical conditions related to obesity, such as type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure often improve as people begin to lose substantial amounts of weight. For those who have struggled with their weight their entire lives, have tried every diet possible and have lost weight only to regain what was lost and more over and over again find bariatric surgery to be an effective method of reaching a healthy weight that is sustainable.

Risks

As with any surgery, there are risks involved during the actual procedure itself. Following surgery, complications can also occur, including but not limited to:

  • nausea
  • diarrhea
  • bloating
  • excessive sweating when eating too muchYour doctor can explain in detail all the risks involved.

Requirements Before Bariatric Surgery Is Approved

Not everybody is eligible for weight loss surgery; however, there are some qualifying requirements from the American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery:

  • Patient must be an obese adult ie BMI = 30 or higher
  • Patient must also be suffering from a related disease e.g. type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure (hypertension)
  • The patient knows and fully understands the risks and benefits of his/her bariatric surgery intervention procedure
  • The patient demonstrates a commitment to healthier lifestyle changes after the operation in addition to adopting a ‘cleaner’ eating regime.
  • Heavy smokers are requested to quit their habit.

Teenagers

Despite the increase in applications, bariatric surgery is not recommended for young adults in the age group 15-19.That being said, exceptional cases are considered especially when the type of obesity is diagnosed as  ‘morbid’ for the individual concerned :

 Morbid obesity is diagnosed by determining Body Mass Index (BMI). BMI is defined by the ratio of an individual’s height to his or her weight. Normal BMI ranges from 20-25.  An individual is considered morbidly obese if he or she is 100 pounds over his/her ideal body weight, has a BMI of 40 or more, or 35 or more and experiencing obesity-related health conditions, such as high blood pressure or diabetes.

Morbid obesity is a serious health condition that can interfere with basic physical functions such as breathing or walking. Those who are morbidly obese are at greater risk for illnesses including diabetes, high blood pressure, sleep apnea, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), gallstones, osteoarthritis, heart disease, and cancer.

Another issue that has to be stressed is the fact that there is no guarantee that you will be approved even if you fulfil all the requirements described previously.Insurance carriers are differ in their policy arrangements and considerations.If you are interested in weight loss surgery and feel that you can satisfy the stringent requirements, you should speak to your doctor about how to take the next step.

The final part of this post is in many ways a “commercial spot” for furniture adapted for use by the heavier (and taller) members of our society. This is something for obvious reasons is not given the serious thought and consideration it deserves but it is a cause of great concern and embarrassment for somebody who is overweight and cannot find the adequate public facility to assist him/her as regards for example seating. This ignorance on the part of the rest of us is no different from that experienced by the disabled and physically handicapped members of our society.

So continuing on the ‘bariatric’ theme of this post ……….

What is a Bariatric Chair ? In short, bariatric chairs are oversized seating designed to support more than 300 pounds of evenly distributed weight. But there’s a lot more to it than that. Every office needs to be equipped with some big and tall seating, but this type of furniture is especially important for medical facilities that need to put guest safety at the forefront of every choice that’s made. Here’s what you should consider when it comes to the bariatric chairs you put in your healthcare facility.

Number of bariatric chairs: How many bariatric chairs you’ll need in your building will depend on the nature of your medical facility. We recommend a minimum of 15-20% of the seating in your waiting room be bariatric, though places such as orthopedic clinics should have more due to the types of patients they assist. When it comes to selecting how many bariatric chairs to add to the space, the key is to know your patient population and plan for it accordingly.

Also keep in mind that bariatric seating should be added not only to the reception area, but to the patient rooms as well. Provide at least one high weight capacity guest chair to each patient room. You may also want to equip each room with a bariatric doctor stool that has an extra-large seat and a reinforced base. Not only might healthcare providers need them, but patients sometimes sit on these stools as well.

Weight capacity. There are no BIFMA standards for the load limit on bariatric chairs, but a 750 pound weight capacity or greater is typically preferred in healthcare settings. Many medical offices even look for bariatric chairs that can hold 1000 pounds or more. When shopping for your bariatric seating, be sure to note the difference between whether the weight capacity listed is referring to a static load or an active load. A static load weight capacity is the amount of weight a chair can hold when something is sitting still on top of it. In contrast, an active load weight capacity is the amount of weight a chair can hold when something is dropped on top of it. For active load capacity, chairs are put through a drop test meant to simulate the action of a person plopping down into the seat, making this a sometimes more reliable measurement of load limit, depending on your needs.

  • Seat and arm design. The seats on bariatric chairs do vary quite a bit, but if you’re looking for the best of the best, select an option with a shallow seat design. A shallower seat will prevent guests from sinking down into the chair, making it easier for them to get up out of it without making a scene. Most bariatric chairs have a seat width of around 24”-30” to accommodate guests appropriately. When it comes to the arms of the chairs, be sure to select an option that guests will not get stuck in as they try to get up. Although the width of the seat will often account for this, you may also want to select chairs that do not have enclosed arms or potentially those that do not have any arms at all. If you do choose bariatric chairs with arms, be sure that the arms have been tested to support the weight of somebody leaning on them to get up from the chair.
  • Seat and arm design. The seats on bariatric chairs do vary quite a bit, but if you’re looking for the best of the best, select an option with a shallow seat design. A shallower seat will prevent guests from sinking down into the chair, making it easier for them to get up out of it without making a scene. Most bariatric chairs have a seat width of around 24”-30” to accommodate guests appropriately. When it comes to the arms of the chairs, be sure to select an option that guests will not get stuck in as they try to get up. Although the width of the seat will often account for this, you may also want to select chairs that do not have enclosed arms or potentially those that do not have any arms at all. If you do choose bariatric chairs with arms, be sure that the arms have been tested to support the weight of somebody leaning on them to get up from the chair.
  • Dignity. The key to good healthcare design, particularly when it comes to bariatrics, is to ensure that your patients and other guests will maintain a sense of personal dignity during their visit. In other words, they shouldn’t have to struggle to get into and out of a chair, and they shouldn’t feel like they’re being singled out by being forced to sit in a seat that looks very different from the other chairs in the room. Make bariatric patients feel just as comfortable both physically and emotionally as you want all of your patients to feel by providing attractive, easy-to-use seating options that support more weight than standard chairs. Safety and design are just about equally important when it comes not only to bariatric seating, but when it comes to the design of your healthcare facility as a whole.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *